March 2014


Ian & Rin

Rin and Ian

It’s no secret that I like Fairy Cube. The manga isn’t perfect, but what I really appreciated about it is how well balanced the two main leads were. Often times, it’s so easy for a writer to write one character as strong and the other as weak, or write weakness in a way that denies agency. It feels as if some writers think showing any real weakness would somehow undermine how “cool” or “powerful” or just strong that particular character is. But that’s not really what makes someone strong and furthermore having a character that only knows how to look cool is often the quickest way to make a boring character. Likewise, having characters that embody only weakness and helplessness often causes readers (well at least me) to get frustrated with the character. Weakness is only interesting when it’s paired with some sort of character growth or balanced in some way by adding aspects of strength. Do we really want to see Character A wallowing in self pity over and over? That’s as equally boring as having a flawless character! (more…)

First volume of Limited Lovers: Nothing to suggest it has anything to do with a young girl in a wheelchair.

First volume of Limited Lovers: Nothing to suggest it has anything to do with a young girl in a wheelchair.

Limited Lovers was brought to my attention when someone told me about how Karin, the heroine, strives for her dream even through she lost the use of her legs and is now reliant on a wheelchair. With a premise like that alone, I was pretty intrigued about this 3 volume manga. You don’t see much diversity in manga. It’s definitely there, but the majority of stories don’t deal with people who have specific health issues, a different sexuality, or gender identity. Retrospectively, the title should have been somewhat of a warning sign. Limited Lovers doesn’t conjure the best implications and images (even if it was probably unintentional going by the ending), but having been told Karin would be striving for a dream against prejudice about her being in a wheelchair, I didn’t pay this much heed. (more…)